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Matcha

Wikipedia: Matcha | Teaviews: matcha-tea 
Last Updated: Jan. 13, 2014 

About Matcha

Black and brown ceramic bowl filled with pale green tea powder, bamboo whisk on side, on wooden surfaceMatcha is a powdered tea, traditionally prepared with a whisk like the one shown here. Photo © Christopher Michel, CC BY 2.0.
Matcha(抹茶), also less commonly called hikicha, is a finely-powdered Japanese green tea made out of the same leaves that gyokuro is made from. Matcha, however, is not just powdered gyokuro. To produce matcha, the same leaves used to produce gyokuro are dried by a different process, producing a type of tea called tencha(碾茶). Matcha is then produced by removing the stems and leaf veins of the tencha, and grinding the remainder of the leaf to a fine powder. The intermediate step, tencha, is not widely available outside of Japan.

Matcha is the type of tea used in the Japanese tea ceremony.

To prepare matcha, the powder is added directly to water and, unlike most other teas, is not filtered out. The powder can be filtered through a sieve before adding it to water, to break up clumps. The traditional method of brewing matcha involves mixing it with a bamboo whisk in a bowl. Brewed matcha has an opaque, bright-green color and strong flavor. Although the flavor of matcha closely resembles other green teas in many ways, the opacity and consistency of the brewed tea is unlike any other.

Black bowl filled with bright green liquid with many bubbles and a bit of foamTraditionally-prepared matcha tends to be a bit foamy, with many bubbles. Photo © cyclonebill, CC BY-SA 2.0.
Because of its finely-powdered form, matcha is easily added to desserts, baked goods, and other foods in order to impart a strong green tea flavor. Because matcha is so expensive, companies sell special cooking grade matcha or kitchen grade matcha, also called culinary grade, for the purpose of adding to desserts or other foods. This matcha is usually more astringent than the matcha intended for drinking.

The finely-powdered state of matcha makes it lose its aroma quickly; once opened, it does not stay fresh as long as most green teas. Matcha is also sometimes added or blended into green teas, including those available in teabags. Matcha is often blended with genmaicha, resulting in a blend called Matcha-iri genmaicha(抹茶入り玄米茶).

Matcha is typically made in Japan, although it is also made in other regions as well, including in Kenya. In addition to the familiar style of matcha, Kenya also produces a matcha-like powdered white tea called white matcha. We do not classify this as matcha, but rather treat it as a style of white tea in its own category.

Recent Matcha Reviews — RSS rss icon

73 / 100
Picture of Matcha Japanese Green Tea (Imperial Grade Matcha)

An acquired taste for some although I like it - not the cheapest tea to buy and not really worth it if youre not into it. Can understand that as the color is not initially appealing to new tasters. I find it better than economy greens which often lack flavor

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70 / 100
Picture of Matcha Green Tea

Matcha Green Tea from Green Foods

Style: Matcha – Region: Japan
Jan. 1st, 2015

Not a bad matcha. I used a little milk and think this would be even better with all milk instead out water. I like this kind of drink creamy. Also felt it needed some sweetness, so I added honey. This set of flavors blended very well. I'm looking forward to trying this tea a number of different ways.

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70 / 100
Picture of Matcha Cafe Blend (Sweetened)

Matcha Cafe Blend (Sweetened) from Bare Tea

Style: Matcha – Region: Japan
Dec. 11th, 2014

I loved matcha in Japan, but I really need more practice brewing it. This matcha tastes of good quality and has a proper level of sweetness (not overdone). I like it, but I need to try it more to determine how best I like it. I do know that mixing in a little milk first to make a paste before adding the hot water makes...

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67 / 100
Picture of Matcha Japanese Green Tea (Imperial Grade Matcha)

So overpriced - but very good Matcha - with a bright green taste - a bit grassy but not bad. Elegantly packaged as is Teavana's Style - you pay for all that packaging.

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87 / 100
Picture of Matcha Japanese Green Tea (Imperial Grade Matcha)

Always I go to Teavana to drink a matcha and when prepare it good taste a clorofila, if dont, taste regularly good. (

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Most-Rated Matcha

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Matcha Japanese Green Tea (Imperial Grade Matcha)

Brand:Teavana
Style:Matcha
Region:Japan
Caffeine:Caffeinated
Leaf:Powdered
64
4 Ratings
Picture of Starter Matcha

Starter Matcha

Brand:Matcha Outlet (Formerly Red Leaf Tea)
Style:Matcha
Region:?????
Caffeine:Caffeinated
Leaf:Powdered
1 Rating
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Japan Matcha Hikari Organic

Brand:TeaGschwendner
Style:Matcha
Region:Japan
Caffeine:Caffeinated
Leaf:Powdered
1 Rating
Picture of Liquid Jade Matcha

Liquid Jade Matcha

Brand:The Tao of Tea
Style:Matcha
Region:Kyoto, Japan
Caffeine:Caffeinated
Leaf:Powdered
1 Rating
Picture of Matcha Cafe Blend (Sweetened)

Matcha Cafe Blend (Sweetened)

Brand:Bare Tea
Style:Matcha
Region:Japan
Caffeine:Caffeinated
Leaf:Powdered
1 Rating

Top-Rated Matcha

No image of this tea

Matcha Japanese Green Tea (Imperial Grade Matcha)

Brand:Teavana
Style:Matcha
Region:Japan
Caffeine:Caffeinated
Leaf:Powdered
64
4 Ratings

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